woman sitting on couch with dog

Many homeowners have worked to develop good habits for their home maintenance—especially when it comes to their indoor air quality. They might run the vacuum every week, replace their air filters every other month, and schedule their HVAC maintenance on an annual basis. But what about duct cleaning? All too often, homeowners forget about the important behind-the-scenes part of their heating and cooling system. You can’t neglect your ductwork!

 

A Quick Overview on Ductwork

Ductwork is the series of nifty pathways that move warm and chilled air throughout our homes. It’s how the forced air from your HVAC system gets carried from room to room. We use these systems almost every day, but they can be easy to forget about since they’re behind the walls.

When installed properly, your ductwork will be sized correctly for your home’s furnace and air conditioner. This helps ensure that you get the best efficiency rating with your setup. The fit will also need to be properly sealed. Any space or gaps between duct pieces will just let that hot or cold air escape into your attic or crawl space—which is a real pain for your energy bills.

The other concern about your ductwork’s efficiency relates to cleaning. A dirty duct system just makes it harder for your HVAC equipment to work correctly. This is similar to how you replace your furnace filter and the oil in your car. Cleaning your equipment is much more cost-effective.

 

Duct Cleaning Benefits

For the average home, duct cleaning is recommended every 3 years. This gets rid of any dust or chemicals that have been lurking in your ductwork and lowering the indoor air quality for your family. Cleaning your ductwork also removes dander, so it can be particularly helpful if you own pets. And since duct cleaning stops these air pollutants from continuously cycling through your home, it can be particularly beneficial for allergy and asthma sufferers.

Aside from the getting a regular duct cleaning every 3 years, a few other circumstances might call for a duct cleaning service, too. Namely, indoor remodeling work. Sanding hardwood floors, having new drywall hung, or tearing down drywall for a new, open layout can add lots of pollutants and dust to your indoor air. After this type of work, duct cleaning, furnace maintenance, and an air filter change are great ways to get your indoor air all freshened up.

 

LCS Duct Cleaning Services

When you’re ready to schedule your duct cleaning service, it’s important to work with the pros. As you research different companies, you’ll want to pay special attention to the type of equipment being used. How teams manage these projects makes a big difference in your overall results. (You don’t want to leave any of those dust bunnies behind.)

Here at LCS Heating and Cooling, we take indoor air quality very seriously. That’s why we choose to work with a negative air machine. Not all duct cleaning companies have this type of high-tech gear. Instead, they might be relying on just a big vacuum and a brush.

With our equipment, though, we can effectively remove even very fine particles and contaminants from your ductwork system. And because the negative pressure is continuous and closed, you won’t risk releasing that dust and grime into your rooms. It all stays secure in the vacuum setup. We’ve found this to be the best way to loosen and trap those contaminants, so you get a really detailed clean.

Getting your home or office air freshened up is easy when you have the right team, and we can help! Contact us today to learn more about our duct cleaning service packages. We’ll get the job done right.

family sitting in living room

The cool air, turning leaves, and arrival of apple cider at the store mean that autumn’s official start is just around the corner. At home, this seasonal change can quickly translate into higher energy bills. Fortunately, there are a few ways to lower these costs. Staying comfortable in your home—at an affordable rate—is relatively easy when you opt for energy-efficient solutions.

 

Schedule Your Heating Tune-Up

This time of year, the biggest energy bills for your home relate to heating. In order to get the best efficiency rating for your furnace, it needs to be able to run smoothly. Any problems during this season can be a real issue for your overall costs. But you can catch issues early on by scheduling your heating tune-up. This service helps ensure that all of your system’s components are within the normal operating range. That way, if any part is having trouble, you can have the option to be pro-active for a repair or replacement. And this could save you a service call down the road!

 

At LCS Heating & Cooling, we offer Annual Maintenance Plans to help keep service and energy costs low year-round. Getting notified of any potential problems lets you stay up-to-date on your furnace’s needs. When you look ahead to winter, no one wants to be caught without heat. A quick visit from your local HVAC company can help you avoid that inconvenience before the cold snap.

 

Other Home Efficiency Tips for Fall

Once your furnace is in order, you can still work to lower costs in other ways. Adding these efficiency tips to the mix can help you finish the year with extra energy savings. Try them all for the biggest benefits, or just stick to a few to get the ball rolling.

 

1. Change your air filter

We always recommend preventative maintenance to prep your home. But if you do nothing else this season, replace your air filter. It’s important to swap out your 1-inch air filter every 1-2 months. (The larger 4 to 5-inch media filters can last for 6-12 months.) This simple step goes a long way for your unit’s overall efficiency. A dirty filter can put a lot of strain on your heating unit and make it harder for the warm air to circulate through your home.

 

2. Warm up with the sun

The days and nights are getting colder, but the sun is still shining. Make the most of sunny days by opening your curtains to let this natural heat inside. South-facing windows tend to have the most impact. Just keep your curtains closed when the sun is set to hold in the warmth, then pull them back in the morning to create some sunny spots. This will help boost your home’s temperature. Plus, it gives your dog or cat a great place to nap!

 

3. Adopt a smart thermostat

When you want to go above and beyond for your home energy savings, a new thermostat can be a real winner. A programmable thermostat is a great investment because it lets you set schedules for your heating and cooling programs. You’ll get more efficient ratings, for instance, when you tell the heat to drop slightly in the evening, or when you’re away at work. A smart thermostat is even better because you can control your home’s settings right from your phone.

 

4. Grab some free LED bulbs

Changing your old lightbulbs to LED versions is a fantastic way to cut costs on your energy bills because they use up to 66% less energy. They even last over 20 times longer than standard bulbs. The best part about these updates? You can get LEDs for free! The Free LED Program from Duke Energy will ship bulbs right to your home. The potential savings could be upwards of $100, so there’s no reason to pass up this deal.

 

5. Watch for home air leaks

Feeling a cold air draft around your windows or outside doors indicates a heating leak. Don’t let these spots add to your energy bill. Adding fresh caulk around these borders or replacing the weatherstripping can prevent your home’s heat from escaping. The other thing to check is your fireplace damper. Make sure to always keep this closed when your fireplace isn’t in use. Accidently leaving it open is just another way to lower your indoor temperature.

 

Take this advice, and you’re sure to have a more energy-efficient home for the colder months. What’s more, you’ll be able to enjoy upgrades like a smart thermostat during the warmer months as well! If you have questions about other energy savings solutions for your home, give LCS Heating & Cooling a call at (317) 238-3961. We’d be happy to help you out!

man and woman standing in front of house with dog

Talk with any industry expert, and they probably know some funny lingo that’s hard for “outsiders” to follow. In the HVAC world, this can be really frustrating—especially when you’re trying to make an informed decision. That’s where LCS Heating & Cooling comes in. We’re all about taking the mystery out of your systems and repairs!

For starters, it’s good to review what HVAC itself even refers to! The acronym is a mash-up of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. Together, these systems are what keep your indoor environment comfy year-round. If you need a refresher on the most common HVAC terms and why the parts matter, just skim through this post. (We promise to keep it simple.)

 

9 HVAC Terms to Know

At LCS, the solutions we design for your home are meant to provide you with “lasting comfort solutions.” Of course, these HVAC solutions will always change from home to home and between families. That’s why it’s important for us to have a variety of offerings that address specific struggles or concerns.

 

1. Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)

Most people think of air pollution as just an outdoor problem, but it can also be a major issue indoors. When we talk about systems for indoor air quality (or IAQ for short), the focus is on filtration. Getting rid of lingering odors is only the beginning. The latest air cleaners also work to remove bacteria and dust mites, so you get honestly fresh air—that isn’t masked by perfumes or other chemicals.

 

2. Heat Pump

These nifty units can help keep your home comfortable through every season! Like air conditioners, these systems are located outside. As the name suggests, a heat pump works to move heat. When it’s hot outside, the heat pump will pull warm air out of your home and push it outside. In the colder months, it helps circulate heat throughout your home by drawing in warm air from outside. (Because even in really cold temperatures, there’s still some amount of heat in air that’s above absolute zero, or -273.15 degrees Celsius!)

 

3. Compressor

The AC (or heat pump) compressor is what circulates your unit’s refrigerant. The refrigerant liquid then absorbs or releases heat to make your home comfortable. Compressors can either work in a single-stage or two-stage cooling setup. Single-stage cooling is the most common, but two-stage comes in handy if you need extra humidity control or a better efficiency rating. Plus, two-stage compressors also aid in noise reduction.

 

4. Evaporator Coil

The evaporator coil is located indoors, inside the furnace. It holds the cold refrigerant in your air conditioner or heat pump. When hot air blows over the evaporator coil, the refrigerant warms up and turns into gas. This helps removes that heat from your indoor air, making your home cooler. Heat pumps also use evaporator coils in the wintertime. But then, the process goes into reverse. Instead of sending heat outdoors, it draws warm air into your home.

 

5. Condenser Coil

Air conditioners and heat pumps use condenser coils to either collect heat or release heat. First, the gaseous refrigerant runs from the evaporator coil to the condenser coil, where it returns to its liquid state. Then, the AC or heat pump fans blow over the condenser coil to either heat or cool your home, depending on what you need.

 

6. Whole-Home Humidifier

During the dry, winter months, whole-home humidifiers can really help boost your home’s cozy factor. By adding a touch of moisture back to your indoor air, humidifiers help create balance. When your air is too dry, it’s easy to get static and dry coughs and cracked skin. These whole-house systems are great because they work with your ductwork to reach every room. And unlike portable units, you don’t have to worry about adding or changing the water—the system knows how to take care of everything for you.

 

7. Whole-Home Dehumidifier

A dehumidifier works in the opposite way of a humidifier. Instead of adding moisture to your air, these units work to remove humidity indoors. It’s a perfect solution for Indiana weather because sometimes the humidity is high even when it's not hot outside! And when the temperature isn’t that high, the air conditioner doesn’t run long enough to remove humidity—only a dehumidifier can. So, whether it’s spring, summer, or fall, having a whole-home dehumidifier is a great way to keep your home from feeling too sticky or too dry. What you’re left with is just crisp, clean air.

 

8. Heat Exchanger

Heat exchangers are found in gas furnaces only. Because that’s where combustion takes place, they basically do the bulk of the work inside your gas furnace. The heat exchanger pulls air into the unit and then transfers heat to warm it up. Once the air is nice and toasty, the blower motor distributes the air throughout your house via the ductwork. Without a functional heat exchanger, your furnace won’t be able to raise the temperature to a comfortable setting during the colder months.

 

9. Whole-Home Zoning

If your upstairs level is way hotter than downstairs, your home might be a good candidate for whole-home zoning. These setups designate specific areas in your home that get heated or cooled independently. That way, your system doesn’t have to struggle to correct the temperature in every room. By setting a limit on where it runs, you only use energy for the places you really need your unit to run.

 

HVAC Repairs for Central Indiana

It’s easier to know what’s going on when you understand the terms and process and “WHY” behind each HVAC decision. At LCS Heating & Cooling, we do everything we can to educate you about the equipment in your business or home. After all, a big part of having lasting comfort solutions is understanding what they are!

Frustrated with a touchy thermostat? Not sure why your unit is making that weird, rattling noise? Our team is here to help. We’ll walk you through the problem and always do our best to make sure you’re informed every step of the way.

For great year-round service, check out our Residential Energy Savings Plan. These regular check-ins will make sure all the major features of your HVAC equipment are running smoothly. Call us at (317) 238-3961 to get scheduled before the frost sets in. We look forward to serving you!

 

notebook and pen

Not sure who to call when the AC breaks down? You’re not alone! Deciding which HVAC company to go with can be a confusing process, but things get a lot simpler when you work in stages. If your AC isn’t working quite right, or you’re thinking about a system upgrade, take a look at these checklist items first. A little research can help you find an HVAC company you can trust.

 

Part I: Examining Your AC Unit

Whenever you can, try to check on a few things with your unit before making a service call. Sometimes a quick fix is all you need to solve the problem.

  • Check the thermostat. This is often the first place we go, but double-check to make sure it’s set correctly. If the thermostat screen is blank, that might mean you need to replace the batteries (if it takes any).
  • Replace your air filter. Hands down, the best way to keep your HVAC unit in good order is to regularly change your filter. Old filters restrict air flow and can even stop your system from working if they’re dirty enough.
  • Clear the area around your AC unit. Landscaping debris might be blocking the air flow around your system. Make sure the unit can run properly and efficiently by cleaning up, and then confirm that the breakers are turned on.

If nothing has changed after taking those steps, it might be time to call in a professional. Try to make a couple notes on your unit’s symptoms so you have all the information you need to schedule the visit. Strange noises with your HVAC unit, odd smells, and any new cold or hot zones in your home are all indicators that your system needs servicing.

 

Part II: Finding a Reputable HVAC Company

So you’re ready to bring in the professionals, but not sure who to call? You’ll be more likely to find a great HVAC company when you stick to a few guidelines.

  • Ask your contacts about recent service. Try posting a status update on social media to say you need service. Your friends and family will be happy to tell you about their last HVAC experience—whether good or bad, you should easily be able to get a few first-hand accounts about local companies.
  • Read online HVAC reviews. More and more people are using Yelp to review HVAC companies. If you have a company you’re thinking of calling, check out a few of their reports first. It’s a good sign if customers are praising their HVAC repairs, not just the system replacements. That usually means the company is honest (because they’re not trying to up-sell) and works with your best interests in mind.
  • Confirm that the company is bonded, insured, and licensed. The City of Indianapolis requires a permit for replacing an air conditioner. Visit your HVAC company’s website to make sure they are licensed in your area. Working with a company that’s bonded and insured will also protect you from any complications that might happen during a service call.

When it comes to HVAC repairs and new installations, a company’s experience matters a lot more than their location. Your best option may not always be the company that’s closest to you, so feel free to check credentials in a wider radius.

 

Part III: Reviewing Your AC Service Call

Once you’ve selected a company to try out, pay close attention to how they handle your service during their visit. Comparing etiquette is often just as important as comparing price!

  • Was the technician professional? Using shoe coverings in your home and cleaning up around the worksite are signs of good employee training.
  • Is the company’s pricing straight-forward? Having a flat-rate fee for service calls is standard practice, but it’s an added bonus if your HVAC company says they’ll waive the service fee if your system needs more expensive repairs.
  • Did your technician explain the next steps? A good tech will tell you exactly what they checked and be able to confidently answer all of your questions. If they said a certain part on your unit needs replacing, they should also tell you whether it’s covered under warranty.

Last but not least, be sure to trust your instincts when hiring a new home services company. Doing your research is definitely a plus, but sometimes you’ll just know a good thing when you see it. If you’ve already vetted your new HVAC company, the only other thing you can do is to go with your gut!

Big news in 2015 for the HVAC industry! Have you heard!? There's a new Seer minimum in place! Okay, let's be honest, unless you're in the HVAC industry working with this every day, this is likely not very exciting news. There's a pretty good possibility that you haven't even heard about it! We're here to explain what the new minimum is, what it means and how it affects you.

A Seer rating is an energy efficiency rating on air conditioners and heat pumps. At the end of 2014, the minimum Seer rating was 13 seer. The new minimums affect some parts of the United States differently than others.  For these purposes, the U.S has been divided into a North Region, South Region and Southwest Region.  Since we're located in Indianapolis, we'll focus on the change in Indiana, which is in the North Region.

What is the new minimum?  Effective 01/01/2015, the new minimum seer rating for heat pumps has changed from 13 seer to 14 seer. For now, air conditioners are staying the same at 13 seer.

What does this mean?  13 seer heat pumps are no longer being manufactured.  When you are ready to replace your current heat pump, you'll likely be quoted at least a 14 seer.  A 14 seer heat pump will come at a higher initial cost than a 13 seer heat pump but there's also more energy savings  with a 14 seer.

Can I still get a 13 seer heat pump?  For awhile, there will be 13 seer heat pumps that were manufactured in 2014 or before that are still available.  The entire U.S. has moved to a minimum 14 seer heat pump rating, so once those 13 seers that were manufactured in previous years are gone, they're gone.

Does this affect me now?  We saw an advertisement recently in which the message was implying that everyone had to replace their heat pumps now to adhere to the new standards.  This is simply not true.  The new standards are for new equipment going forward.  The new standard does not say you have to upgrade right now!  It's not illegal to currently have a 13 seer heat pump installed in your home.  It just means that when it's time for new equipment, 14 seer is the minimum.

Does this affect me if I have an air conditioner?  No, it does not!  The new standard in Indiana is for heat pumps only.  Eventually, yes, air conditioners will also move to a minimum 14 seer rating but it's not happening this year in Indiana or any of the North Region.  In other states (the South and Southwest Regions), the minimum has already changed for both air conditioners and heat pumps.

We hope this helps to answer your questions about the new minimum seer ratings!

 

arrow icon pointing up

We've received several calls this winter about rising utility costs. People have been concerned because they're seeing upwards of $400-$500 electric bills. Yikes! We'd like to share some tips on what you can do to find out if you're experiencing "normal" bills or if there might be a problem causing them to be high.

There are things that can be done to your home to increase efficiency. These things include insulating, caulking, checking for drafty areas, etc. For our purposes now though, we're going to assume that your house is in the same condition this year as it's been in prior years.

So, is your electric bill high or might there be an HVAC problem?

First things first, call your utility company. Ask what the neighborhood average is and compare to your bill. Ask if the kilowatt rate has changed. Ask if the therm rates have changed. This will give you a good idea on whether your bill is comparable to that of your neighbors. It'll also make you aware of rate increases that have happened which could contribute to higher bills from previous years.

If your electric bill is higher than the neighborhood average, here are some other things to consider:

If you are all electric, you should have a heat pump and electric furnace (also called an electric air handler). This is the most efficient type of HVAC system to have in an all electric house. Many people set their programmable thermostat to be one temperature during the day and another at night. If you are all electric, do not set the temperature difference to be more than 3-4 degrees apart. Larger temperature differences will cause the back-up electric to come on to supplement the heat pump. It's costly to run the auxiliary heat. The savings that you are getting from the lower temperature is being offset (or costing more) by the back-up electric running to catch up.

Do you change your filter regularly? How long has it been since your furnace has been cleaned and tuned? Dirty filters restrict air flow and cause the system to run longer to heat the house. This causes a higher electric bill. Dirty filters over a period of time or a lack of filters at all can result in dirty coils. A dirty coil can also restrict air flow. If the heat pump isn't working, the electric furnace is running by itself to heat the house. It's expensive to run an electric furnace by itself. The average amp draw on a heat pump is 6-15 amps. The average amp draw on an electric furnace with a 10kw auxiliary heat kit is 41-44 amps. That's a big difference which is why you want your heat pump running efficiently.

Do you keep registers closed throughout the house? If there's a temperature difference between the upstairs and downstairs, for example, people tend to close the registers in a room or area of the house. Do not close registers. This can also restrict air flow, causing the system to overheat and short cycle. This means the furnace will be shutting down and turning back on more than it should be, which uses more electricity and costs you more.

One more thing to keep in mind. Some people have a high efficient heat pump system and then are surprised by their electric bills when it's really cold outside. They get a high bill and think...but I just got a high efficient system. Heat pumps are most efficient in the heating season when it's between 35-60 degrees outside. In Indiana, it's not unusual to have 0-20 degree days (or weeks). When it's that cold outside, heat pumps need the auxiliary heat from the electric furnace to keep up. The heat pump can't keep up by itself meaning you're losing that efficiency rating because the electric furnace is doing most of the work. It's costly to run auxiliary heat compared to a heat pump or gas furnace. If you buy a high seer heat pump, it's important to understand that the seer rating is mainly for the summer months.

We hope this has been helpful! If you continue to have high electric bills, give us a call. Maybe there's a problem with the heat pump causing the auxiliary heat to run more than it should. Maybe there's a bank of heat not working in the electric furnace. It's worth checking out, especially if those high electric bills are causing you a lot of stress!

house covered in snow

Compared to some Indiana winters, we've been pretty lucky this year! Winter is still winter though and we're right in the middle of it. With a couple of cold months still left, the question should be asked: How's your home holding up? We'd like to share some customer HVAC questions we've had over the past month as well as provide some tips to protect your home against the harsh winter days.

Q: My furnace is running but it's not keeping the temperature that I have it set at.
A: Have you checked your filter? A dirty filter restricts air flow and can affect the operation of the furnace. During milder outdoor temperatures, a filter that's a little dirty may not affect anything at all. During colder outdoor temperatures, the same filter can cause the furnace to have to work harder and fall behind. Filters may have to be changed more often than usual during extreme outdoor temperatures.

Q: I usually keep my whole house humidifier set at 40% but I've recently noticed that my windows are sweating.
A: When outdoor temperatures get really cold, you may have to turn your humidifier down. Once the outdoor temperatures warm back up a little, you can turn it back to it's normal setting. When there's too much of a humidity difference between the outdoors and indoors, you may notice some sweating. It's a common misconception that the colder it is, the higher the humidifier should be turned up. The opposite is actually true. In addition, houses differ in how insulated they are (amount of insulation, leaky windows and doors, etc). Therefore, one house may notice window sweating at 30% and another at 40%. Adjust the humidistat up or down accordingly.

Q: Why is there ice on my heat pump?
A: There's not a cut and dry answer for this. A heat pump has a defrost cycle that it goes through to melt the ice under normal circumstances. If ice is there at one time and gone the next time you look, then it is likely operating normally and has gone through the defrost cycle. If you see ice for days on end, there's possibly a problem. It could be a number of things. Turn the heat pump off by taking the thermostat to emergency heat. That will help thaw the ice so it can be properly diagnosed.

Q: My electric bills are outrageous!
A: If you are all electric, our first question will always be: do you have a heat pump or air conditioner? An electric furnace running by itself to heat your home is very inefficient and expensive. If you have an air conditioner with electric furnace, it's worth considering replacing the air conditioner with a heat pump. If you do have a heat pump and still have unusually high electric bills, there could be a problem with the heat pump or furnace. The heat pump could be under-charged, it could not be going into defrost mode, a bank of heat in the electric furnace could be stuck on, etc. It would be worth having your equipment looked at if you feel like your utility bills are high.

Here are ten other tips that we have to prep your home for colder days to come:

*Have your furnace cleaned and tuned-up
*Test sump pump
*Caulk around windows and doors
*Remove hoses from outdoor spigots
*Check insulation in attic. It should be a minimum of 12 inches
*Check door thresholds for gaps
*Plug in carbon monoxide detectors if you have gas appliances (stove, furnace, water heater, etc)
*Reverse ceiling fans
*Have your fireplace, chimney and vents inspected to make sure all is in good condition
*Clean gutters

Feel free to reach out to us if you have any additional questions. Stay warm and cozy!

3 dogs and 2 cats

There's a common passion among all of us at LCS Heating and Cooling.  Well, in addition to home comfort and the mechanics of HVAC that is! The common passion is animals.  We love dogs, we love cats, one of our techs even has a rabbit! We're just animal people.  It never surprises me to get a random picture throughout the day of a dog or cat.  It's usually a customer's pet that Travis takes a picture of and says- check this little one out! katy aloneOne of our installers even sent a picture of a customer's pet turtle that hung out in the backyard with them while they changed the heat pump.  So, where are we going with this?

IMAG0146We were all talking a few weeks ago about wanting to have some "community projects." We're excited to tell you about our first one!  One of our customers is Freeland Animal Hospital (www.freelandanimalhospital.com). They are located at Pendleton Pike and Sunnyside in Indianapolis. They are fantastic people and care so well for their furry clients!  Each year, they have an Angel Tree in which they accept donations of dog and cat food, treats and supplies. All donations then go to a local rescue.  This year the local rescue is PAWS (http://www.pawshancock.org), located in Greenfield.

Now through the end of the year, LCS Heating and Cooling, LLC has the following "Promotion" going on:

**For each new customer that signs up for Annual Maintenance (our Energy Savings Plan), we will donate a bag of dog or cat treats. Here's the link for more information about our Energy Savings Plan for your HVAC equipment:  https://lcstempsite.dreamhosters.com/esp.html

**For each new furnace install, we will donate a 5lb bag of dog or cat food.

**For each new full system install (furnace & air conditioner), we will donate a 15lb bag of dog or cat food.

Will it be dog or cat food?  The choice is yours!!

We are so excited to help a local rescue that helps so many dogs and cats each year. Who do you know that's thinking about having some HVAC work done?  We greatly appreciate your referrals and personal business.  The animals will too!

 

assorted Lennox units

We get lots of questions regarding HVAC maintenance.  This is a good thing!  It means people care about their HVAC investment.  Since we're entering air conditioner season, let's focus on questions relating to air conditioner maintenance:

  • What is air conditioner maintenance?  Preventative maintenance is completed on the a/c to ensure that it is running properly and as efficiently as possible.  The air conditioner is cleaned and there are many components that are checked.  If a reading is off or out of range, the homeowner will be made aware.  Keeping the air conditioner clean also ensures proper air flow.
  • Can I turn my air conditioner on before maintenance has been completed?  Yes!  The air conditioner can certainly run before maintenance is done.  Keep in mind that maintenance keeps it running as efficiently as possible.  
  • What months do you schedule maintenance?  We generally start scheduling maintenance mid-April, depending on the weather, and continue to schedule throughout the summer.  It's more important that maintenance is done each year rather than it being done a specific week or month.
  • Can the service be completed if it's raining?  We will reschedule your maintenance appointment if it's raining or below 60-65 degrees outside.  Although the techs do have raincoats, we don't want some of the tools and gauges out in the rain.  We also don't want your a/c exposed to the moisture.  The new R-410 refrigerant attracts moisture 10 times more than the old R-22 refrigerant.  We don't like to take chances, so we'll always reschedule if it's raining.  In addition to being dry outside, it also needs to be at least 60-65 degrees outside.  If it's colder than that, the temperature drop and readings could be inaccurate.  Accuracy is key, so we will reschedule if it's too chilly outside.
  • How will I know what the technician does during the service?  The technician will complete an invoice detailing everything that was completed during the maintenance service.  He will also let you know how everything looked and answer any questions you have about your system.
  • How much does an annual maintenance plan cost?  Our plan is $150 per year.  That includes the maintenance service on the a/c in the spring or summer and the maintenance service on the furnace in the fall/winter.  Other benefits included with the plan are:  No service call if a return visit is needed within 30 days, $10 off service call, 15% off repairs, 15% off indoor air quality (humidifiers, filters, thermostats, UV lights, etc) and no overtime rates if service is needed in an evening, weekend or holiday.
  • Does maintenance guarantee that my air conditioner will not break down?  Air conditioners are machines and can break down at any time.  That being said, there are issues that can be found during maintenance and either repaired at that time or at least brought to the homeowner's attention.  For example, the technician may see that a motor reading is in range, but on the high end.  While it doesn't necessarily need replaced at that time, the homeowner can be made aware that the motor is on it's way out.  It could last another week or it could last another 6 months.  In any case, the homeowner is now aware.
  • Will you change my filter while you're here doing maintenance?  Absolutely!  If you already have filters, we will gladly change it for you.  If you don't have filters, we can provide you with the price to bring one with us.  We also have an online filter program in which we can provide you with a code to order your filters online and have them delivered to your door.  Shipping is free and you'll always have your filters on hand.
  • What if I have two HVAC systems at my house?  We can put each system on the annual maintenance plan.  We'll schedule a longer period of time to be at your house to complete maintenance on both air conditioners (and same in the fall/winter for the furnaces).  The second system would be $10 off ($150/$140 for two plans).
  • Do I need to be home when you do the air conditioner maintenance?  Preferably, yes.  We will need access to the thermostat and furnace area so will need inside the house.  If you have a lockbox or garage code, we can enter that way but always prefer having someone home so the technician can answer any questions while he's there.

Hopefully, we answered some of your questions about air conditioner maintenance!  If not, feel free to contact us as we're happy to discuss.

woman cleaning counters

We've had one of the coldest winters on record here in Indianapolis so it seems everyone has spring fever!  With the arrival of spring comes a whole checklist of home maintenance items just waiting to be done.  Here's a list of items that you can do around your home

to tidy up and get ready for summer:

  • Schedule air conditioner maintenance (you knew this would be #1 on our list, right?)
  • Change the filter
  • Install new batteries in thermostat
  • Install new batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors
  • Test and dust all detectors
  • Check fire extinguishers
  • Inspect bathroom, kitchen, door and window caulk; re-caulk as needed
  • Clean and seal deck if needed
  • Inspect exterior paint and touch up as needed
  • Inspect siding/masonry for damage
  • Repair/replace damaged window screens
  • Inspect roof for damage
  • Inspect outdoor play equipment
  • Inspect attic for leaks
  • Inspect attic insulation
  • Clean gutters
  • Prune spring and summer- flowering shrubs after they bloom
  • Schedule yearly septic tank inspection
  • Schedule irrigation inspection
  • Inspect foundation for drainage problems
  • Inspect crawl space/basement for moisture issues

Preventive maintenance goes a long way.  Monitoring items such as these can prevent big problems in the future! Enjoy spring!